Editorial Board

Tommaso Gorla

Tommaso Gorla is an Italian artist and researcher, as well as the founder and chief editor of the visual culture journal Anima Loci (2019). His interests revolve around the agency of images and their affective role within processes of memory and recollection. He works as an associate lecturer at the University of Westminster, the Camberwell College of Arts, and London Metropolitan University, as well as at Accademia Santa Giulia in Brescia, Italy. He holds a PhD in Anthropology from the EHESS, Paris.

Francesco Della Puppa

Francesco Della Puppa is a researcher in social sciences at Ca’ Foscari University of Venice. He holds a PhD from the University of Padua. He was Post-Doctoral fellow between 2012 and 2017, both at the University of Padua and Ca’ Foscari University of Venice. His core research interests concern the social transformations prompted by migration phenomena. He is a member of the Master’s Programme on ‘Migration Phenomena and Social Transformations’ and the ‘Laboratory for Social Research’ as well as the ‘International Centre for Humanities and Social Change’ at Ca’ Foscari University in Venice. He is author of two monographs and several articles for international scientific journals.

Alex Wilk

Alex Wilk works as an independent researcher and has professional experience in arts publishing. She is currently an editorial assistant at the photography and visual culture journal Archivo Platform. She also works as a research assistant for the curator Hans Ulrich Obrist and previously for the designer Cecil Balmond. Alex was an editor of Balmond Studio’s e-journal Thinking in Practice and led the production of Balmond’s book Crossover (Prestel, 2013). Alex’s research takes visual and textual formats: she has taken part in art residency programmes, exhibitions and has published articles. Underpinning her interests is an exploration of the cultural construction of nature, voice and the subject from posthumanist and feminist perspectives. Alex holds an MA in Cultural Studies from Goldsmiths, University of London.

Joey Chin

Joey Chin (1986) is an artist and a Pushcart-nominated writer and poet. Her work is located at the intersection of text, narrative and visual art, staged through poetry, acts and modes of reading, and various disruptions. Her key focus is in the development of personal communications between the self, markings of territoriality, and the inner conversations between the two. She explores etymologies and language use of the Chinese and Greek language through the English lyric and prose. Joey holds an MFA in Creative Writing (Poetry) from the City University of Hong Kong, and her work has received scholarships, grants, and awards from numerous organisations including ArtHub Asia, Asia Europe Foundation, the Royal Over-seas League Arts (United Kingdom), the Dorothy Cheung Foundation (Singapore), the National Arts Council (Singapore), the Run Run Shaw Library (Hong Kong), and the Society for Humanistic Anthropology (US).

Jean-Benoît Vétillard 

Jean-Benoît Vétillard is a French architect, living and working in Paris. He currently teaches Representation and Visual Culture at the École de la Ville et des Territoires de Paris-Est and has previously taught at the École Spéciale d’Architecture in Paris (Atelier des Extrapolations Métropolitaines). In 2019 Jean-Benoît Vétillard was the recipient of the prestigious EUROPE 40 UNDER 40 architecture and design award, from The Chicago Athenaeum: Museum of Architecture and Design and The European Centre for Architecture Art Design and Urban Studies. In 2018, he also received the Albums des Jeunes Architectes et Paysagistes award, which is a biennial competition organised by the French Ministry of Culture. After working for several French and Italian architectural studios, including Block Architecture, Salottobuono, Projectiles, Atelier Ciguë and Berger&Berger, he founded his own practice in 2014. His work bridges art, design, and architecture, developing installations as well as private and public projects.

Amedeo Policante

Amedeo Policante is a critical theorist and historian of political thought. He holds a PhD from Goldsmiths College, University of London and is currently a Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the University of Warwick. He is the author of two recent monographs: I Nuovi Mercenari: Mercato Mondiale e Privatizzazione della Guerra (Ombre Corte, 2014) investigating the on-going commodification of security and the resulting fragmentation of social space both at the global and at the urban level; and The Pirate Myth: Genealogies of an Imperial Concept (Routledge, 2016) focusing on shifting representations of piracy in legal, literary and popular culture, and the role they have played in international politics since the eighteenth century. He has also published several articles and book chapters on the political thought of Karl Marx, Carl Schmitt and Michel Foucault; as well as  an ethnography of political protests and their visual representation. These works have been disseminating via traditional means such as academic journals, magazines and newspapers; and alternative means such as ‘The Pirate Camp’, a collaborative artistic project featured at the 54th International Art Exhibition of the Venice Biennale.

Peter Lešnik

Peter Lešnik is a scholar of cinema and media whose main research and teaching interests include the politics of the moving image, media archaeologies, documentary cinema, adaptation studies, and ecocriticism. After completing his BA and MA at Ca’ Foscari University of Venice, in 2019 he earned his doctoral degree from the University of Pennsylvania with a dissertation on Michelangelo Antonioni’s screen adaptations of literary texts. He taught for two years courses in film history and film analysis at the University of Pennsylvania, and he is currently teaching at the School of Advanced Studies at the University of Tuymen.

Federico Pagello

Federico Pagello is Lecturer in Film and Media Studies at D’Annunzio University of Chieti-Pescara. He received his PhD from the University of Bologna, and has worked as a post-doctoral fellow at the Universities of Bologna, Limoges and Belfast (Queen’s). His research deals with the history and theory of film and popular media, with a focus on the transnational and transmedia circulation of serial narratives. He has published two monographs (Grattacieli e superuomini. L’immagine della metropoli tra cinema e fumetto, Le Mani 2010; Quentin Tarantino and Film Theory: Aesthetic and Dialectics in Late Postmodernity, Palgrave Macmillan 2020), as well as a number of articles and book chapters included in international peer-review journals and edited collections.

Andrew Hewish

Andrew Hewish is a contemporary artist and curator in London, who works in a variety of media. He is also the Coordinator of Critical Contextual Studies in Art and Photography at the School of Art, Architecture and Design at The Cass. He holds a PhD from the Royal College of Art (RCA) under the supervision of Barry Curtis and Ian Kiaer. In 2020, he was awarded BEM for educational services in the arts. In 2004 he founded the Centre for Recent Drawing, a social practice and a UK charity which has curated over 100 exhibitions in drawing and where he remains as Executive Director. He sits on the board of Poetry School, a UK charity, and has previosuly curated the public engagement in research and exhibtion programme at the Warburg Institute, University of London, and has been Visiting Academic at the University of Oxford’s Ruskin School of Art.



Recent articles

In 2019, the collapse of the Córrego do Feijão dam in Minas Gerais, Brazil, released a mudflow that left environmental and humanitarian devastation in its wake. Two years later, artists Bárbara Lissa and Maria Vaz returned to the zone to document the aftermath. In this text, they consider the limitations… Read more »

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Mundus Subterraneus, published in 1664, is the final result of German Jesuit scholar Athanasius Kircher’s geological investigations. Here we publish an extract from the chapter, De Lapidibus, in which Kircher muses on the cognitive phenomenon which will be later known as pareidolia – seeing faces and figures within natural formations, in… Read more »

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Glimpses of images, by nature marked by constraints and boundaries: the time and space that you might capture during apnea diving. In this photo-essay, Gianluca Tesauro reflects on his own experience as a freediver and on the idea that, as humans, there will always be something that we cannot access.

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