Anima Loci Sólheimajökull Glacier, Iceland, by Davide Bloise

Sólheimajökull Glacier, Iceland. Photo credit: Davide Bloise

Submission Information

Publishing monthly, the journal is aimed at whoever has an interest in the power and role of images within society. Approaching this theme from a variety of perspectives and fields, Anima Loci welcomes the work of contributors from both academics and practitioners from a range of backgrounds including (but not limited to): writers, researchers, scientists, artists, philosophers, poets, designers, architects, photographers.

The journal publishes academic papers as well as first-person narratives and photo-essays. Whilst rigorous in their investigations and use of theoretical frameworks, the texts should be also accessible to a non-specialist audience of readers.

Each article should be between 600 and 2000 words and should be accompanied by at least one image related to the subject.

If you would like to submit a piece for publication, please email info@animaloci.org with the following materials:

  • A title and 150-250 word abstract for the article
  • 1 relevant key image that will illustrate the article
  • A 150-250 word biography for each author of the article

 


Recent articles

Originally

, 15 March 2020

Hong Kong’s unique geographic characteristics make this city a place where the manmade and the natural densely coexist. During several walks across the urban landscape, French photographer Gaëtan Chevrier records this intricate relationship, normally overshadowed by the bustling life of this financial capital. The photographs and reflections that follow further… Read more »

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Of foxes and men

, 15 February 2020

Sharing the fabric of our cities with wild animals is the norm. As long as they do not encroach upon the boundaries of the domestic wall, the space in which we live is also that of birds, mice, insects and other species. In London, urban foxes are the most iconic… Read more »

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Constructing the wilderness

, 15 January 2020

Starting from the exploration of the so-called “viàz”, an arduous mountaineering route in the Zoldo Dolomites, Silvia Segalla reflects upon the concept of “wilderness” as applied to the mountain, which within the social imaginary seems to have become a reserve and bastion of nature. In an era in which a… Read more »

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