Jean-Benoît Vétillard 

Jean-Benoît Vétillard is a French architect, living and working in Paris. He currently teaches Representation and Visual Culture at the École de la Ville et des Territoires de Paris-Est and has previously taught at the École Spéciale d’Architecture in Paris (Atelier des Extrapolations Métropolitaines). In 2019 Jean-Benoît Vétillard was the recipient of the prestigious EUROPE 40 UNDER 40 architecture and design award, from The Chicago Athenaeum: Museum of Architecture and Design and The European Centre for Architecture Art Design and Urban Studies. In 2018, he also received the Albums des Jeunes Architectes et Paysagistes award, which is a biennial competition organised by the French Ministry of Culture. After working for several French and Italian architectural studios, including Block Architecture, Salottobuono, Projectiles, Atelier Ciguë and Berger&Berger, he founded his own practice in 2014. His work bridges art, design, and architecture, developing installations as well as private and public projects.

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Recent articles

In 2019, the collapse of the Córrego do Feijão dam in Minas Gerais, Brazil, released a mudflow that left environmental and humanitarian devastation in its wake. Two years later, artists Bárbara Lissa and Maria Vaz returned to the zone to document the aftermath. In this text, they consider the limitations… Read more »

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Mundus Subterraneus, published in 1664, is the final result of German Jesuit scholar Athanasius Kircher’s geological investigations. Here we publish an extract from the chapter, De Lapidibus, in which Kircher muses on the cognitive phenomenon which will be later known as pareidolia – seeing faces and figures within natural formations, in… Read more »

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Glimpses of images, by nature marked by constraints and boundaries: the time and space that you might capture during apnea diving. In this photo-essay, Gianluca Tesauro reflects on his own experience as a freediver and on the idea that, as humans, there will always be something that we cannot access.

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